July 6th, 2013

wwdd

High Art, meet Low Art, and vice versa.

I saw Fast 6 again a few days ago. I have nothing but the most profound and uproarious love for this franchise. Fast's thrilling confidence in their own insanity is breathtaking. And you know, I think that's my number one criteria for liking something--it has to really own what it's about. I mean, the same goes for people, too. Nothing bothers me more than watching people spin situations or their personalities/accomplishments/etc. into things they're not. Not that I don't, and not that there aren't certain situational hats that call for this or that version of yourself. But there are real ways and disingenuous ways to do this. tl;dr UGH posers, UGH pretension.

Anyway, what I really wanted to note here was that last week, I went to a contemporary art museum with a friend, which had a very strange exhibit up. I didn't photograph the paintings, because I wasn't sure if that was allowed, but surely you can infer what it was from the placard:



Yup, fan art. I'm not really sure how to feel about the exhibit, honestly. I'm all for the "legitimizing" of fan works, I guess, but I don't really know if I should trust what's written on the placard. Are there people who find slash a subversive act? Is that your motivation, slash writers/artists on my flist? And if it is, where does it rank with regard to, you know, just being endlessly interested in the pairing? I guess my deal with this idea is, I obviously find fanworks skillful. There's technique, motivation, theme, analysis, and everything else behind these works. There is subversion and whatever the hell else that placard brings up at work, for sure--and I'm a lit person, I feed off this kind of stuff. It's what I'm in love with. I'm the kind of person who reads things specifically for their formal techniques, or their experimental stylistics.

But at the same time, the whole fandom idea is that we're making these things as artists of various mediums, lovers of that medium, but also as fans. So would it have been so hard to note on your placard, THESE IMAGES SERVE MY OWN SOCIAL AND HOMOEROTIC AGENDAS BUT ALSO THE AGENDA WHERE I JUST REALLY FUCKING LOVE STAR TREK?

To quote John Green:

“Nerds like us are allowed to be unironically enthusiastic about stuff… Nerds are allowed to love stuff, like jump-up-and-down-in-the-chair-can’t-control-yourself love it. Hank, when people call people nerds, mostly what they’re saying is ‘you like stuff.’ Which is just not a good insult at all. Like, ‘you are too enthusiastic about the miracle of human consciousness’.”

Also, this article is a recommended read: The Cosmology of Serialized Televsion. Fantastically written article, though ultimately I disagree with the value judgments that accompany this taxonomy. The more unstable the mythology, the more enticing I find it. Boo on Aristotle--embrace the clusterfuck that is contemporary storytelling!